Linux To The Rescue.

One of my common post types is a big up for Linux, but I can’t help feeling that this one is worth it.

Here at work I was presented with an old, battered laptop whose owner had schlepped around the world with it. It was refusing to start, and the request was to help extract important data before it became inoperable forever.

In the early stages I got lucky and managed to get the computer to boot successfully into Windows. However, the success was short lived, and the system froze, displaying a classic blue screen of death.

The next approach was to try and clone the data from the system using CloneZilla. I created a bootable USB stick, restarted the machine and began cloning the partitions. Unfortunately the two important partitions kept on throwing errors on particular sectors and stopping the cloning process in its tracks. And as the system discs were all using NTFS I wasn’t able to attempt any kind of on-the-fly repairs.

In the end, I got a live CD version of a low resources Ubuntu (Lubuntu, using the LXDE window manager) and booted the system with that. The boot process was seamless and the window manager started without a problem. I then used the command line and some Linux know-how to mount the Windows hard drive and an external hard drive provided by the user. Then it was just a matter of finding the data that the user wanted saved and copying it using the normal file system manager.

It has taken a while. The USB interface on the machine is slow, and data reading from the hard drive seemed sluggish, but it has worked well, and all of the users data is now safe.

It is worth noting that when I say ‘Linux know-how’ then it makes it sound simpler than it was. I realised this when the user asked whether it would be possible for me to tell her how to mount the discs if she needed to do. I started to explain the process, then realised (prompted by the way her eyes were glazing over) that while it is obvious to a long term Linux user it might as well be in a foreign language to a new user. Worse than that, when I tried some Google-Foo I wasn’t replete with good explanations that way either. I’m not sure if this is a failing of my Google-Foo or a gap in the otherwise excellent on-line documentation.