Synergy – Control For More Than One Computer At A Time.

I am not, by habit or practice, a tidy person. This is strongly reflected in my work desk which is awash with stacks of papers, forms and diaries. Unfortunately, I am also someone who has two computers on my desk (see many previous comments on the subject).

The computer I use most is a 27″ screen iMac. The screen is lovely, with excellent image quality.

However, I don’t particularly like Apple keyboards, so I don’t use an Apple keyboard. Instead I have a wireless Logitech keyboard (a  K230 for the record). The previous keyboard that I had didn’t have a number pad on it, so I added a separate wireless number pad (also Logitech, a N305). I’m also not that keen on Apple mice because I need at least two buttons and the direction of scrolling is all wrong, so I have a trackball, which I like because it doesn’t need lots of desk space (M570).

The brilliant thing about the Logitech kit is that they all link using Logitech’s ‘Unity’ wireless system, and, importantly, each Unity USB connector can support up to 6 devices. That means I can have the keyboard, number pad and trackball all connecting to a single USB connection, and I don’t lose a heap of precious USB ports.

I am very happy with this setup and can type quickly, mouse around accurately and enter data in spreadsheets efficiently.

Then there is my other computer. The keyboard is stiff and not particularly pleasant to use, and the mouse is an old Apple mouse (pre touch surface, even pre-rollable nipple thing) where the whole case of the mouse is the button. Its horrible.

So how do I manage this setup, and the challenges of limited desk space, preferred hardware etc. Enter Synergy, a simple system to manage multiple computers from a single keyboard and mouse.

Setting up Synergy appears to be easiest when you are sharing multiple Windows computers as Windows is provided with a nice handy app where you can name computers and define where their monitors lie in relation to one another. Users of other systems need to create and edit a text file to define these relationships. So I chose to make the iMac the server machine and the Windows machine a client. Following instructions was simple enough, and after having a few connection issues caused by misnamings of the two systems I was suddenly up and running.

I have a similar issue in starting the Synergy server on my Linux box that I have setting the keyboard, activating the screensaver etc, so initially I was tempted to append the instructions to activate the server onto the script that sets these things up. However, the only time I’m going to use the Synergy system is at work, so it doesn’t make sense to add this overhead to all my Linux systems. Instead I created a script which launches the Synergy server. I run this after my initial login (and after the keyboard setting script).

Using Synergy is simply a matter of mousing over to the screen edge which is defined as the point at which the two computers meet. For reasons of understandability this should be the edge of the screens where the monitors abut. Pause for a moment and the mouse will flip over to the other screen, and you are in control of the other computer.

One unforeseen advantage of this has been the way that the keyboard layout on the server computer, that is the iMac is the keyboard layout used on the other computer. As I have written elsewhere, I use a non-Qwerty keyboard layout. In Linux I can choose a Dvorak keyboard layout, but with UK punctuation (a £ sign, the @ sign being on the middle row, just by the return key etc). I also have the Caps Lock key and the left hand Ctrl key swapped so that I have a Ctrl key on the home row of the keyboard. Replicating the finer points of this in Windows is difficult as the normal Dvorak options are US English, Dvorak left handed and Dvorak right handed. Customisation is possible, but it requires installation of extra programs and understanding an arcane piece of software.

However, using Synergy with Linux as the server fixes this as the Linux keyboard layout is carried over to the Windows computer as I flip over. Bonus!

 

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